Super Mario Bros 2D games

Super Mario Bros. (スーパーマリオブラザーズ Sūpā Mario Burazāzu?) is a 1985 platform video game developed by Nintendo, published for the Nintendo Entertainment System as a pseudo-sequel to the 1983 game Mario Bros. It is the first of the Super Mario series of games. In Super Mario Bros., the player controls Mario and in a two-player game, a second player controls Mario’s brother Luigi as he travels through the Mushroom Kingdom in order to rescue Princess Toadstool from the antagonist Bowser.

The success of Super Mario Bros. has caused it to be ported to almost every one of Nintendo’s major gaming consoles. Nintendo released special red variants of the Wii and Nintendo DSi XL consoles in re-packaged, Mario-themed, limited edition bundles in late 2010 as part of the 25th anniversary of the game’s release. In 2005, IGN‘s poll named it as The Greatest Game Of All Time.[8]

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Warrior Orochi 3

Warriors Orochi 3, originally released as Musou Orochi 2 (無双OROCHI 2?) in Japan, is a 2011 hack and slash video game developed by Tecmo Koei and Omega Force for the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360. This is the fourth installment of the crossover series Warriors Orochi, being the combination of the Dynasty Warriors and Samurai Warriors series. This installment serves as a sequel to Warriors Orochi 2. The game was released in Japan on December 22, 2011, in Europe on April 6, 2012, North America on March 20, 2012 (PlayStation 3) and March 27, 2012 (Xbox 360).[4][5] There are two ports of the game, Musou Orochi 2 Special released on July 19, 2012 for PlayStation Portable exclusively in Japan[6] and Warriors Orochi 3 Hyper was released as a launch title for the Wii U for Japan, North America, and Europe.[2]

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Dynasty Warrior 6 Game instruction

Dynasty Warriors 6 (真・三國無双 5, Shin Sangokumusou 5) is the sixth title in the Dynasty Warriors series. It is a total revamp from previous games and has been rebuilt from the ground up. Koei planned to make this game feel like an old kung-fu action movie as the attacks are motion-captured by real life martial artists. Though the game was designed to be released exclusively for next-gen consoles, the company decided to release a PlayStation 2 version of the title.

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Electronic art

Electronic Arts, Inc. (EA) is an American developer, marketer, publisher and distributor of video games. Founded and incorporated on May 28, 1982 by Trip Hawkins, the company was a pioneer of the early home computer games industry and was notable for promoting the designers and programmers responsible for its games. Electronic Arts is the world’s third-largest gaming company by revenue after Nintendo and Activision Blizzard.[3]

Currently, EA develops and publishes games under several labels including EA Sports titles, Madden NFL, FIFA Soccer, NHL, NCAA Football, SSX and NBA Jam. Other EA labels produce established franchises such as Battlefield, Need for Speed, The Sims, Medal of Honor, Command & Conquer, as well as newer franchises such as Dead Space, Mass Effect, Dragon Age, Army of Two and Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic, produced in partnership with LucasArts.[4] EA also owns and operates major gaming studios in Tiburon in Orlando, Burnaby, Vancouver, Montreal and DICE in Sweden.[5]

History

Originally, EA was a home computing game publisher. In the late 1980s, the company began developing games in-house and supported consoles by the early 1990s. EA later grew via acquisition of several successful developers. By the early 2000s, EA had become one of the world’s largest third-party publishers. On May 4, 2011, EA reported $3.8 billion in revenues for the fiscal year ending March 2011, and on January 13, 2012, EA announced that it had exceeded $1 billion in digital revenue during the previous calendar year.[6] In a note to employees, EA CEO John Riccitiello called this “an incredibly important milestone” for the company.[7] EA began to move toward direct distribution of digital games and services with the acquisition of the popular online gaming site Pogo.com in 2001.[8] In 2009, EA acquired the London-based social gaming startup Playfish,[9] and in June 2011, EA launched Origin, an online service to sell downloadable games directly to consumers.[10] In July 2011, EA announced that it had acquired PopCap Games, the company behind hits such as Plants vs. Zombies and Bejeweled.[11]

EA continued its shift toward digital goods in 2012, folding its mobile-focused EA Interactive (EAi) division “into other organizations throughout the company, specifically those divisions led by EA Labels president Frank Gibeau, COO Peter Moore, and CTO Rajat Taneja, and EVP of digital Kristian Segerstrale.”[12]

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